Spice Up Your Life!

* the opinions expressed are those of the author and not Nutrition Ink.

 

Are spicy foods making us live longer? Research shows that consuming spicy foods is

 

associated with reduced risk of mortality.  A study was done with both men and women

 

aged 30- 79 years old. Participants who consumed spicy foods 6-7 times a week had a   

 

14% reduction of mortality. So, what is the ingredient in spicy foods that suggest this

 

evidence?  The chili pepper contains an ingredient called capsaicin that carries a number

 

of benefits. These benefits include reducing cancer risk, lower blood

 

pressure and boost metabolism. These spices are known to increase lipid catabolism,

 

which can protect you from hypercholesterolemia (high cholesterol) and obesity. Being

 

protected from these two can help reduce hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and

 

cardiovascular disease. Not only does chili have these benefits, they have shown to get

 

rid of the bad bacteria in the stomach to create a healthy gut.   Having a healthy gut can

 

reduce the risk of diabetes, liver cirrhosis and cancer. Reducing this risk can reduce the

 

risk of mortality. In conclusion, spice up your life; after all, it has a variety of benefits that

 

can aid in longer life.

 

 

References

 

Consumption Of Spicy Foods and Total and Cause Specific Mortality: Population Based Cohort Study

Lu Qi-Canqing Yu-Ling Yang-Yu Guo-Yiping Chen-Zheng Bian-Dianjianyi Sun-Jianwei Du-Pengfei Ge-Zhenzhu Tang-Wei Hou-Yanjie Li-Junshi Chen-Zhengming Chen-Liming Li -   https://www.bmj.com/content/351/bmj.h3942

 

 

The Association Of Hot Red Chili Pepper Consumption and Mortality: A Large Population-based Cohort Study

Mustafa Chopan-Benjamin Littenberg - https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0169876

 

 

 

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